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Stocks - Investing and trading for all

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I want to open an actively managed portfolio & I want a portfolio manager to make trades on my behalf and monitor my growth and make suggestions. I specifically want to invest in Forex

I want to invest in forex, index etfs and index bfs. What's the best resource? Who should I open an account with? Looking for low fees, transparency, communication and experience.
submitted by Ameerrah9 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

So I’m buying EITHER the ASX-listed ETF (IVV) or the US-listed ETF (VOO) for the same index (S&P500). How does forex affect the growth of the ASX-listed fund?

If the Aussie dollar weakens, ceteris paribus, does IVV.AX increase or decrease in value?
submitted by GlacialFox to AusFinance [link] [comments]

What should I trade? Options, Forex, Futures, Equities/Indexes/ETFs, etc?

Hey guys,
I'm really interested in developing a focus on trading stocks but I am unsure of which area to explore. A little about my situation is that I have a capital of 15k, and plenty of time and commitment to invest into trading. It is not enough of a balance to initiate day trading. So I want to figure out which areas would net me the biggest % return since I have the TIME to fully invest into trading. What are generally the strongest areas to trade in and what is the trend of the market currently?
Thanks !
submitted by iemg88 to stocks [link] [comments]

Asia-Pacific Market News: Indexes, Bonds, Forex, Key Commodities, ETFs (Seems there is a calm in the storm, for now)

Asia-Pacific Market News: Indexes, Bonds, Forex, Key Commodities, ETFs (Seems there is a calm in the storm, for now) submitted by Wolf_of_Coinstreet to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Has anyone here opened an SIPP account at Interactive Brokers?

Hey all,
I have a pension with Aviva through my employer but recently realized that the 0.5% fees they're charging are a bit high. For the size of my pension portfolio (~£300k) this comes to about £1500 per year. Moreover, I've recently started to take a bit of interest in managing my investments and I find myself limited by the funds they provide. They also take too long (~upto a week) to process requests for moving investments.
For these reasons, I've been looking at opening an SIPP. An SIPP would hopefully give me a bit more control and also cost less. I'm primarily interested invest in US Shares & ETFs. I compared some of the popular pension providers like HL, Interactive Investor, iWeb.
My observations about the fee structure:
So now, I'm looking for an SIPP which ideally has the following:
During my search, I stumbled upon a lesser known route using which you can get an SIPP account at Interactive Brokers - https://www.interactivebrokers.co.uk/en/index.php?f=38149. IB themselves are not SIPP administrators so you need to register with an SIPP administrator who has a master account at IB and then you can get an IB Cash sub-account under that administrator.
IB appears to be checking all my boxes, but I'm just not very sure about the SIPP Administrators that I might need to use. I found a few: https://www.atsipp.co.uk/, http://www.candpsipp.co.uk/, https://www.optionspensions.co.uk/personal-pensions. They all appear to be somewhat less popular names and small in size.
Has anyone here done this? Do you have any recommendations on which SIPP Administrator I should use? Any gotchas?
Or maybe there's another SIPP that provides the features I'm looking for?
submitted by nearly_wed to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]

What is the best way to invest in index funds and ETFs while living in Germany?

Background: My wife and I live in Germany. She is a EU citizen and I'm American. The account would be in her name to make things easier tax wise. We're interested in investing in index funds and ETFs. We're trying to decide on a platform to go with but are having trouble figuring out the best option for us. Ideally we'd like a platform that offers a wide selection of ETFs and index funds, but it does not need to offer FOREX, cryptocurrency, etc.
Which potential option would you recommend for our situation? It'd be nice to hear anyone's feedback who has used any of these platforms.
  1. Fonds Spärlane or Savings plan - The DKB Sparpläne https://www.dkb.de/privatkunden/wertpapiersparen/fonds/. This seems like a good option. They have a decent selection of products and offer the ability to automatically purchase into a fund/ETF each month. Since they are a German Bank they have to offer tax forms as well, which makes life easier.
  2. International Broker - Interactive Brokers or Fidelity International. We don't have 100k to invest so I don't think IB is the right option due to the 10 euro per month fee. Fidelity Int'l has a wide selection but I need to do more research to see what tax info they provide.
  3. German Broker - I haven't come across one that I'm crazy about yet so any recommendations would be helpful.
  4. German Depot Konto - Commerzbank https://www.commerzbank.de/portal/de/privatkunden/sparen-anlegen/produkte/depotmodelle/depot-eroeffnen/depot-eroeffnen.html?gclid=CjwKCAjw5Kv7BRBSEiwAXGDElRF5GnUm8exUdl4NjmQ5eT3lBc6ypA4Xhmc_rn4Dclfs9oRlm8o3ZRoCnysQAvD_BwE. We're already customers there so it would be easy to setup an account. The costs here seem quite high and I don't know yet what kind of product range they offer.
submitted by thesog to eupersonalfinance [link] [comments]

What is the best way to invest in ETFs while living in Germany?

Background: I posted this question on /eupersonalfinance https://www.reddit.com/eupersonalfinance/comments/iy7ay6/what_is_the_best_way_to_invest_in_index_funds_and/ and they said I should post here as well. I've made some changes to the question after more research.
My wife and I live in Germany. She is a EU citizen and I'm American. The account would be in her name to make things easier tax wise. We're interested in investing in ETFs. We're trying to decide on a platform to go with but are having trouble figuring out the best option for us. Ideally we'd like a platform that offers a wide selection of ETFs and it does not need to offer FOREX, cryptocurrency, etc.
Which potential option would you recommend for our situation? It'd be nice to hear anyone's feedback who has used any of these platforms.
  1. International Broker - Interactive Brokers or Fidelity International. We don't have 100k to invest so I don't think IB is the right option due to the 10 euro per month fee. Fidelity Int'l has a wide selection but I need to do more research to see what tax info they provide.
  2. German Brokers - Scalable Capital and Smartbroker look intriguing. I'm leaning towards the latter since they have been around longer.
  3. German Depot Konto - Commerzbank https://www.commerzbank.de/portal/de/privatkunden/sparen-anlegen/produkte/depotmodelle/depot-eroeffnen/depot-eroeffnen.html?gclid=CjwKCAjw5Kv7BRBSEiwAXGDElRF5GnUm8exUdl4NjmQ5eT3lBc6ypA4Xhmc_rn4Dclfs9oRlm8o3ZRoCnysQAvD_BwE. We're already customers there so it would be easy to setup an account. The costs here seem quite high and I don't know yet what kind of product range they offer.
We tried setting up an account with DKB since we read and heard good things about them and their Sparpläne is a solid price. Our account was rejected so we contacted customer service for their help. To put it nicely their customer service is terrible and we've decided to continue our search for a different company.
submitted by thesog to Finanzen [link] [comments]

APIs offered by brokers and data platforms

I’ve been looking for a broker that has an API for index futures and ideally also futures options. I’m looking to use the API to build a customized view of my risk based on balances, positions, and market conditions.
Searching the algotrading sub I found many API-related posts, but then when I actually read them and their comments, I found they’re often lacking in real substance. It turns out many brokers or data services that have APIs don’t actually support index futures and options via the API, and instead they focus on equities, forex, or cypto. So here’s the list of what I’ve found so far. This isn’t a review of these brokers or APIs and note that I have a specific application in mind (index futures and futures options). Perhaps you’re looking for an API for equities, or you just want data and not a broker, in which case there may be a few options. Also, I’m based in the US so I didn’t really look for brokers or platforms outside the US.
If you have experience with these APIs, please chime in with your thoughts. Also, I may have missed some brokers or platforms. If I did or if you see anything that needs correction please let me know.

Platform Notes
ADM Investor Services No API
Ally Invest Does not support futures instruments
Alpaca Only supports US Equities
Alpha Vantage Does not support futures instruments
AMP Broker with a huge number of platforms available including some with APIs
ApexFutures No API
Arcade Trader No API
AvaTrade Does not support futures instruments
Backtrader Not a data feed; otherwise looks cool but also looks like a one-man shop
Cannon Trading Broker with a variety of platforms, some have API access such as TT
Centerpoint No API
Charles Schwab API does not support futures instruments
Cobra No API
Daniels Trading No API
Discount Trading Broker with a variety of platforms including CQG, Rithmic, TT, some with APIs
Edge Clear Broker with a variety of platforms including CQG, Rithmic, TT, some with APIs
Eroom Now part of Dashprime. Offer a variety of APIs including CQG, TT, CBOE's Silexx, and others via FIX.
ETNA Trader Only supports equities, options (including multi-legs), ETFs, Mutual Funds (Forex with cryptocurrencies coming soon)
ETrade API seems robust but OAuth authorization needs to be refreshed via login once per 24 hours
Futures Online No API
Gain Capital Futures API available, based on .NET; unsure if they are open to retail clients
GFF Brokers Broker with a large number of platforms including some with API access
High Ridge Futures Broker with a variety of platforms including CQG, Rithmic, TT, some with APIs
iBroker API available; contact them for more info
IEX Cloud Looks great but does not support futures instruments
Infinity Futures JSON API available; contact them for more info
Interactive Brokers Client Web API looks promising if clunky
Intrinio Supports futures instruments but is expensive
Koyfin No API
Lightspeed C++ API available
marketstack API for equities available. Does not support futures instruments.
Medved Trader Windows app with a streaming API to various data sources and brokers. See comment below about API beta access.
NinjaTrader Does not support futures options
Norgate Data Not a broker; supports futures data for $270/year
Oanda Forex only; API last updated in 2018
Optimus Futures Broker with a large number of available platforms including some with API access
Phillip Capital Broker with a large number of available platforms including some with API access
polygon.io Expensive but looks slick; does not support futures instruments
Quandl API looks solid; $49/monthly for personal use, does not allow distributing or sharing data; not a broker
Quantconnect Does not expose raw data
Quantopian Does not expose raw data
Quantower Software that connects to multiple brokers and data feeds; API to their software via C# interface
Saxo Markets Broker with extensively documented API
Stage 5 Trading API available through Trading Technologies
Straits Financial Broker with several platforms available including some with APIs such as CQG, R
Sweet Futures Broker with a large number of available platforms including some with API access
TastyWorks There's an unofficial Python API
TenQuant.io Does not support futures instruments
ThinkorSwim Does not support futures instruments via the API
Tiingo Free account tier but does not support futures instruments
TradePro Broker with a number of platforms available; unclear if any are available with API access
Tradier Free developer API account for delayed data but does not support futures instruments
TradeStation Nice looking API docs and supports futures instruments; requires opening an account and a minimum balance of $100k and there’s no trial available
TradeFutures4Less Broker with a variety of platforms including CQG, Rithmic, TT, some with APIs
TradingTechnologies API looks robust; pricing starts at $700/month
TradingView Does not expose data API
Tradovate Technologies API exists, documentation unknown; need to talk to their account team
Wedbush Futures Broker with several platforms offered, a few of which have API access
WEX .NET/COM only; pricing not disclosed on website
Xignite Pricing not disclosed on website but they do support futures instruments
Yahoo Finance API Available through RapidAPI or via direct access; but it’s discontinued and unreliable
Zaner Broker with a variety of platforms including CQG, Rithmic, TT, some with APIs

Wow, this list grew longer than I originally thought it would be. If you spot a mistake, please let me know and I’ll correct it.
Edit:
- added Lightspeed API - updated Dashprime to indicate some of the APIs available - added Medved Trader to table - added marketstack to table
submitted by theloniusmunch to thewallstreet [link] [comments]

Switching institutions and investment strategies

I'm looking to get a little more tuned into investing. For the past several years I've been doing the Canadian Couch Potato strategy of e-series index funds with TD in both my RRSP and TFSA. Each of those accounts has about $30k in it, and I also have a LIRA with about $20k that is invested the same way. I recently moved my TFSA to Tangerine and put it in a savings account (partly to take advantage of a high-interest offer they had, but mostly because I'm planning on purchasing a detached home in the very near future and wanted to keep that money in cash). I already used $25k of my RRSP a few years ago for part of the downpayment on my current home, so the $30k I have in there now is really only going to be used for retirement. I also plan on making larger contributions to the RRSP going forward once I buy my next home (I've been skimping on my annual contributions recently to save for my next downpayment). Basically, that RRSP is going to get bigger (well...hopefully) and I will probably not be withdrawing that money for 30+ years until I retire, so I have a high tolerance for risk with that account. The TFSA is going to be emptied for the new house, but I'll probably build it back up slowly with low-moderate risk e-series index fund or ETF.
Lately I've been thinking of taking the RRSP out of TD and moving it to Questrade to dabble in ETFs and stocks. I know stocks aren't very highly recommended here, so maybe I'm just being naive. I was thinking of doing something like keeping half the RRSP (~$15k) in a high growth ETF like XGRO, and then the other half (~$15k) in US stocks that I can play around with...mostly for fun, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't have a couple friends who did pretty well with Tesla and other similar stocks recently and their enthusiasm about it is a bit infectious. As I contribute to the RRSP, I'll probably aim to keep that mix of half going to the ETF and half to stocks. I plan to keep all the stocks within my RRSP to avoid the withholding tax on US dividends, and also use Norbert's Gambit to avoid the forex fee on that initial conversion of $15k CAD to USD.
Additional context: I'm 31, married (dual income), make about $120k myself (I'm only investing my own money), no debt apart from mortgage, no kids (but could happen in the next couple years).
Am I crazy to do this? Should I just stick to index funds and / or ETFs? Maybe I'm being overzealous with the amount I want to potentially gamble away with stocks?
submitted by Superunknown_88 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

IB and quality of their software

Hello!
I've got on IB recently to mostly have there long-term holdings in numerous index following ETFs.
I'm kind of disappointed by disjointed user interface at Client Portal, horrible, ancient technology TWS and cumbersome mobile app.
What people here use out of numerous trading platform options in IB and actually why you use IB in the first place?

EDIT: To expand on this with couple examples: Client Portal has less functionality that mobile app (no adaptive algo trades), TWS for the most part when I try to change layout simply freezes with spinning "wait" wheel of death and mobile app died couple minutes ago with "please wait" when I tried to cancel forex trade.
submitted by etfJunky to interactivebrokers [link] [comments]

Since I angered some Chads on /r/investing here's why I think China is the next "big short".

Fellow idiots,
I posted this comment which seems to have angered the highly sophisticated /investing community. I don't mind being downvoted but at least provide some counter arguments if you're going to be a dick. So in the pursuit of truth and tendies for all, I have prepared some juicy due diligence (DD) for WSB Capital on why China is on the verge of collapse.
TL;DR at the bottom.
Point 1: Defaults in China have been accelerating aggressively, and through July 2019, 274 real estate developers filed for bankruptcy, up 50% over last year. A bonus? Many Chinese state controlled banks have been filing for bankruptcy as well. Just google "china bank defaults" or something similar. Notice how many articles there are from 2019? When the banking system fails, everything else usually fails too.
Point 2: The RMB has depreciated significantly. Last time this happened, in 2015-2016, there was a significant outflow of foreign invested capital. According to the IIF, outflows reached $725bn due to the currency depreciation.. This time is different why again? I have heard some arguments why there will be less outflow this time, but I struggle to buy them.
Point 3: Despite wanting to operate like a developed economy, China still has not been able to shrug off the middle income trap. Their GDP per capita is comparable to countries we normally associated with being developing/emerging markets. Tangentially related to point 10.
Point 4: China is an export-dependent economy, with about 20% of their exports contributing towards their GDP. Less exporting means less GDP, less consumption (because businesses make less money, they pay people less, who in turn spend less), which has a greater effect on GDP than any declines in exports would have at face value. Guess what? Chinese exports dropped 1% in August, and August imports dropped -1%, marking the 5th month this year of negative m/m export growth..
Point 5: Business confidence has been weak in China - declining at a sustained pace worse than in 2015. When businesses feel worse, they spend less, invest less in fixed assets, hire less until they feel better about the future. Which takes me to my next point.
Point 6: Fixed asset investment in China has declined 30 percentage points since 2010. While rates are low, confidence is also low, and they are sitting on a record amount of leverage, which means they simply will not be able to afford additional investment.
Point 7: They are an extremely levered economy with a total debt to GDP ratio of over 300%, per the IIF, which also accounts for roughly 15% of global total fucking debt. Here's an interview with someone else talking about it too.
Point 8: Their central bank recently introduced a metric fuckton of stimulus into their economy. This will encourage more borrowing....add fuel to the fire. Moreover, the stimulus will mechanically likely weaken the RMB even more, which could lead to even more foreign outflows, which are already happening, see next point.
Point 9: Fucking LOTS of outflows this year. As of MAY, according to this joint statement, around 40% of US companies are relocating some portion of their supply chains away from mainland. This was in May. Since May, we have seen even more tariffs imposed, why WOULD companies want to stay when exporting to the US is a lot more expensive now?
Point 10: Ignoring ALL of the points above, we are in a global synchronized slowdown, with many emerging market central banks cutting rates - by the most in a decade. Investors want safety, and safe-haven denominated assets are where we have seen a lot of flocking into recently. Things that can be considered safe-havens have good liquidity, a relatively stable economy, and a predictable political environment.
Would love to hear opposing thoughts if you think China is a good buy. I am not against China, nor any other country for that matter, but I am against losing money (yes, wrong sub etc.), and I can not rationalize why anyone would be putting in a bid.
TL;DR: the bubble is right in front of your face, impending doom ahead, short everything, fuck /investing.
Edit, since you 'tards keep asking me how to trade this, there are a few trades that come to mind:
*not investment advice*
submitted by ComicalEconomical to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

[Spain] Freaking out about my plan to FIRE

I'm a Canadian getting married to a Spaniard and we're planning to live in Spain to be close to her family.
Most of my savings are in CAD and USD and at current rates, they total around 1.5 Million EUR. At a 2% withdrawal rate that would give me around 30k EUyear which is probably enough to cover our cost of living.
I work remotely and can pull in 50-200k EUyear but given Spanish tax rates I'll probably be aiming to make less than <100k EUyear given how high the tax rates are for 60k EUR+. I'll consider it a "semi-FIRE" for the next few years. I still haven't decided whether to go SL or Autonomo but it doesn't seem like there is much difference between the two if I make around 100k EUR based on my calculations.
We don't have a house or plan to buy one right now as we love living internationally and will likely move somewhere new in 5-10 years.
Based on the above, I thought I was in good shape but the more I research Spanish tax rates (which must have evolved from the colonial methods of raping and pillaging all those who are not nobles) the more I'm freaking out about my tax and investment situation here.
  1. We'll live in Castilla y Leon and I understand the wealth tax kicks in at 700k Euros. Can my future wife and I share the allowance (i.e. 1.4 million Euros between the two of us?) or will I get hit for my savings over 700k unless I transfer half of my savings to her?
  2. I historically traded/invested through InteractiveBrokers with long-term passive strategies (Index funds). I'm now reading that USD/CAD ETFs are typically not available to Europeans due to EU laws. I'd rather keep my investments in a diverse mix of currencies - any recommendations on how to do that or the best low management fee ETFs in Europe?
  3. I've read on here that some types of investments can be reinvested in similar funds without being taxed on dividends/ETFs. Does anyone have a link or more information I can read on that? I'm definitely looking for tax-efficient strategies, both with respect to withholding taxes and taxes when I rebalance.
  4. How do ForEx savings/investments get converted for taxes? Is it the spot price on Dec. 31 or average in Q4 of the year or average over the entire year?
    I know a lot about investing and prefer to DIY but I really need to wrap my head around the tax situation here. There seems to be a ton of incorrect opinions and false information spread about and my lack of Spanish ability (I'm learning - but not conversant in technical stuff yet) doesn't help. My fiance and her family are pretty simple and don't seem to have a clue about the world of investing.
If anyone can recommend an English speaking tax lawyer / investment advisor who works on a reasonable fee basis that would be great too.
submitted by Baldpacker to EuropeFIRE [link] [comments]

Forecast for XAU/USD: Gold churns out records

Forecast for XAU/USD: Gold churns out records

Fundamental forecast for gold for today

Precious metal climbed too high

It’s done! What gold bugs had been dreaming about for decades happened: the price has reached a level of $2,000 per ounce. The weakness of the US dollar, the fall of the 10-year U.S. Bond yield to unbelievable minus 1%, and unstoppable growth of ETF reserves did their work. Meanwhile, gold bugs grew much older: according to JP Morgan’s research, the precious metal is usually bought by aged investors, while young traders prefer Bitcoin or high-tech stocks.
Many may find it surprising that gold is growing amidst the rally of US stock indexes. That often happens during recessions, though: enormous volumes of central banks’ cheap liquidity allow investors to build up long positions in risky and reliable assets. What’s more, the market prefers precious metals when it’s unsure about GDP’s recovery.

S&P 500’s and gold’s evolutions

Source: Trading Economics
Even if gold climbed high, there are still a lot of bullish forecasts: Goldman Sachs believes that the prices may go up to $2300 per ounce because investors are looking for a new reserve currency; RBC Capital Markets projects a level of $3,000.
XAU/USD bulls may have succeeded because the recession didn’t follow the 2007-2009 scenario. Then, the Fed’s monetary stimuli were enough for getting the economy back to the trend; now, it’s unclear. Then, the USD was growing as the US GDP’s recovery rate was faster than its global peers’ one; now, it’s falling amidst the economic divergence of growth. Then, the idea that inflation would speed up amidst increased money supply failed; now, it’s still alive. The difference between then and now allows us to say that gold hasn’t stop rallying yet.
The best scenario for gold would be a W-shape recovery of the US economy. It implies extending monetary and fiscal stimuli, further weakening the USD, and a drop in real US bond yields. However, a V-shape recovery of GDP will allow XAU/USD quotes to grow too. A long-term downtrend of the USD index is doubtless. At the same time, the Fed makes it clear that it’s ready to tolerate high inflation, which will raise the bond market rates.

Gold and expected inflation dynamics

Source: Wall Street Journal
The second coronavirus wave in Europe is the main factor in the development of the bullish scenario for gold. Under this scenario, the euro will fall, the USD index will grow and will probably continue growing as the divergence of economic growth will benefit the USA. That scenario is unlikely to happen. So, hold your long positions formed at $1820-1825 per ounce and build them up during retracements. XAU/USD may correct on the Congress’s approval of a new fiscal relief package and strong stats on the US labor market.
For more information follow the link to the website of the LiteForex
https://www.liteforex.com/blog/analysts-opinions/forecast-for-xauusd-gold-churns-out-records/ ?uid=285861726&cid=79634
submitted by Maxvelgus to Finance_analytics [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay
Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to u/bhaskarndas [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay

Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to StockMarketIndia [link] [comments]

Opening a Roth IRA at 18

I recently turned 18 which means I can invest my money now. I did some surface level research about investing but I just want to make sure my information is correct.
Since I'm starting out, I'm planning on opening a ROTH IRA at either TD Ameritrade or fidelity. (Can you open more than 1 Roth IRA at different places; can I have a Roth IRA with both td and fidelity?)
How does money grow in a Roth IRA?
What are options, ETFs, index funds, mutual funds, and forex. (I only know about stocks)
Anything else that can help a newbie trader would help as well
submitted by fireballchamp333 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

When should I choose a Hedged ETF and when not?

When should I choose a Hedged ETF and when not?
Hi there, a couple of things that might confuse and overwhelm to new investors are currency risk and hedging. If you are not familiar with these terms, here and here you have some reading.
Even experienced investors that known the theory finds the choice (or not) of a Hedged ETF sometimes cumbersome due to the back and forth logic that you have to follow in your head. Usually a graph helps to clarify the relation between Currency, Hedged and UnHedged ETFs.

So, decide between both options (if available) is inconvenient?
Well, there are some rules and general recommendations for different cases based on common sense and empirical evidence. That's why I tried to put those recommendations on a flow diagram.
I would appreciate your feedback because this is the first version and it may contain errors so, as usual, before using any information to invest, double check it!

Points to keep in mind (kind of a disclaimer):
  • Currency hedging is a way to manage risk, not to add return and so is the idea of this flow diagram.
  • You won't always find a Hedged version of the ETF that you want.
  • As always, this is a way to help you taking best decisions based on YOUR broad goal. This is not an exact science and one size NEVER fits all.
  • The flow was thought to compare ETFs replicating the same index but Hedged (if available) and Unhedged versions.
  • The logic of the flow is at ETF level, not at Portfolio level. That means that if you apply it to your Portfolio of, lets say 5 ETFs, that does not imply that you should hedge or unhedge your whole Portfolio.
  • Hedged ETFs are always more expensive than Unheged's of the same Index and Provider. Therefor I used that fact for the last decision box, but is purely subjective and at that point you can use any other parameter to tiebreak: Size, Volume, Spread, etc. or all of them.

Change ideas are welcomed!:

Version 2
EDIT 19/04/2020: Version 2 with 1st block addition. An example of why
submitted by Iam_an_80s_guy to ETFs_Europe [link] [comments]

Noob Safe Haven Thread | Oct 14-20 2019

Post any options questions you wanted to ask, but were afraid to ask. A weekly thread in which questions will be received with equanimity. There are no stupid questions, only dumb answers.   Fire away. This is a weekly rotation with past threads linked below. This project succeeds thanks to people thoughtfully sharing their knowledge and experiences (YOU are invited to respond to questions posted here.)
Perhaps you're looking for an item in the frequent answers list below.
For a useful response about a particular option trade, disclose position details, so that responders can assist. Vague inquires receive vague responses. Tell us: TICKER -- Put or Call -- strike price (for each leg, on spreads) -- expiration date -- cost of option entry -- date of option entry -- underlying stock price at entry -- current option (spread) market value -- current underlying stock price -- your rationale for entering the position.   .
Key informational links: • Glossary • List of Recommended Books • Introduction to Options (The Options Playbook) • The complete side-bar informational links, for mobile app users.

Links to the most frequent answers

I just made (or lost) $____. Should I close the trade? Yes, close the trade, because you had no plan for an exit to limit your risk. Your trade is a prediction: a plan directs action upon an (in)validated prediction. Take the gain (or loss). End the risk of losing the gain (or increasing the loss). Plan the exit before the start of each trade, for both a gain, and maximum loss. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture)
Why did my options lose value, when the stock price went in a favorable direction? • Options extrinsic and intrinsic value, an introduction (Redtexture)
Getting started in options • Calls and puts, long and short, an introduction (Redtexture) • Exercise & Assignment - A Guide (ScottishTrader) • Some useful educational links • Some introductory trading guidance, with educational links • Options Expiration & Assignment (Option Alpha) • Expiration time and date (Investopedia)
Common mistakes and useful advice for new options traders • Five mistakes to avoid when trading options (Options Playbook) • Top 10 Mistakes Beginner Option Traders Make (Ally Bank) • One year into options trading: lessons learned (whitethunder9) • Here's some cold hard words from a professional trader (magik_moose) • Thoughts after trading for 7 Years (invcht2) • Avoiding Stupidity is Easier than Seeking Brilliance (Farnum Street Blog) • 20 Habits of Highly Successful Traders (Viper Report) (40 minutes) • There's a bull market somewhere (Jason Leavitt) (3 minutes)
Trade planning, risk reduction and trade size, etc. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture) • Trade Checklists and Guides (Option Alpha) • An illustration of planning on trades failing. (John Carter) (at 90 seconds) • Trade Simulator Tool (Radioactive Trading) • Risk of Ruin (Better System Trader)
Minimizing Bid-Ask Spreads (high-volume options are best) • Fishing for a price: price discovery with (wide) bid-ask spreads (Redtexture) • List of option activity by underlying (Market Chameleon) • List of option activity by underlying (Barchart) • Open Interest by ticker (optinistics)
Closing out a trade • Most options positions are closed before expiration (Options Playbook) • When to Exit Guide (Option Alpha) • Risk to reward ratios change over the life of a position: a reason for early exit (Redtexture)
Options Greeks and Option Chains • An Introduction to Options Greeks (Options Playbook) • Options Greeks (Epsilon Options) • Theta Decay: The Ultimate Guide (Chris Butler - Project Option) • Theta decay rates differ: At the money vs. away from the money • Theta: A Detailed Look at the Decay of Option Time Value (James Toll) • Gamma Risk Explained - (Gavin McMaster - Options Trading IQ) • How Often Within Expected Move? Data Science and Implied Volatility (Michael Rechenthin, PhD - TastyTrade 2017) • A selected list of option chain & option data websites
Selected Trade Positions & Management • The Wheel Strategy (ScottishTrader) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Options Playbook) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Redtexture) • Synthetic option positions: Why and how they are used (Fidelity) • Covered Calls Tutorial (Option Investor) • Covered Calls - Chris Butler - Project Option (20 minutes) • The 10 Most Common Mistakes Made by Covered Call Writers - Allen Ellman - Blue Caller Investor (8 minutes) • Take the loss (here's why) (Clay Trader) (15 minutes) • The diagonal calendar spread and "poor man's covered call" (Redtexture) • Creative Ways to Avoid The Pattern Day Trader Rule (Sean McLaughlin) • Short calls and puts, and dividend risk (Redtexture) • Options and Dividend Risk (Sage Anderson, TastyTrade) • Options contract adjustments: what you should know (Fidelity) • Options contract adjustment announcements / memoranda (Options Clearing Corporation)
Implied Volatility, IV Rank, and IV Percentile (of days) • An introduction to Implied Volatility (Khan Academy) • An introduction to Black Scholes formula (Khan Academy) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile: Which is better? (Project Option) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile in Trading (Tasty Trade) (video)
Miscellaneous: Economic Calendars, International Brokers, RobinHood, Pattern Day Trader, CBOE Exchange Rules, Contract Specifications, TDA Margin Handbook, EU Regulations on US ETFs, US Taxes and Options • Selected calendars of economic reports and events • An incomplete list of international brokers dealing in US options markets (Redtexture) • Free brokerages can be very costly: Why option traders should not use RobinHood • Pattern Day Trader status and $25,000 margin account balances (FINRA) • How to find out when a new expiration is opening up: email: [email protected] for the status of a particular ticker's new expirations.
• CBOE Contract Specifications and Trading Days & Hours • TDAmeritrade Margin Handbook (18 pages PDF) • Monthly expirations of Index options are settled on next day prices • PRIIPS, KIPs, EU regulations, ETFs, Options, Brokers • Key Information Documents (KIDs) for European Citizens (Options Clearing Corporation) • Taxes and Investing (Options Industry Council) (PDF) • CBOE Exchange Rules (770+ pages, PDF) • NASDAQ Options Exchange Rules
Following week's Noob thread: Oct 21-27 2019
Previous weeks' Noob threads:
Oct 7-13 2019 Sept 30 - Oct 6 2019
Sept 23-29 2019 Sept 16-22 2019 Sept 09-15 2019 Sept 02-09 2019 Aug 26 - Sept 02 2019
Complete NOOB archive, 2018, and 2019
submitted by redtexture to options [link] [comments]

What is the best way to diversify a ~$3000 dollar account?

I am currently in college living with my gf at a very cheap place, my monthly expenses are $400 a month, and i’ve just gotten stable hours again at my job doing swimming pools. During the summer, I’ll be working full time making about 1800 a month. By the end of the summer, I should have around 3k in savings . I want to use this to start building a well-balanced, diversified investment portfolio.
I wouldn’t say I’m an expert on investing, but I’ve been through the ringer. I tried my hand at trading crypto and won a little and in the end lost most of it. I learned a lot from my mistakes, I deleted my Telegram signal groups, learned TA and risk management(the most important part) and made investments choices based on my own analysis of facts. The past few months I have been demo trading forex, and have gotten more comfortable with using leverages, only risking 1% on trades, better entries, etc.
A big portion of this 3k I want to use to swing trade foreign currencies, also am curious to hear anyone’s opinion on forex if they want to share.
However, I’m not sure how much I should risk towards riskier investments like forex. I definitely don’t want to put my eggs in one basket.
Lately, I have been looking at more longer term plays like ETFs and the global bond index fund and this seems like a good time to buy in.
So i guess what my question is; Should invest it all into long term holds like ETFS and bonds while they are cheap, or should I open up something in the neighborhood of $1000 into a forex brokerage account, and buy the rest in ETFs or bonds. Also really interested in buying dividend stocks but I don’t know as much about them.
Any advice for a young buck would be helpful, thanks guys and gals
submitted by smgcaleb to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Noob Safe Haven Thread | Oct 7-13 2019

Post any options questions you wanted to ask, but were afraid to ask. A weekly thread in which questions will be received with equanimity. There are no stupid questions, only dumb answers.   Fire away. This is a weekly rotation with past threads linked below. This project succeeds thanks to people thoughtfully sharing their knowledge and experiences (YOU are invited to respond to questions posted here.)
Perhaps you're looking for an item in the frequent answers list below.
For a useful response about a particular option trade, disclose position details, so that responders can assist. Vague inquires receive vague responses. Tell us: TICKER -- Put or Call -- strike price (for each leg, on spreads) -- expiration date -- cost of option entry -- date of option entry -- underlying stock price at entry -- current option (spread) market value -- current underlying stock price -- your rationale for entering the position.   .
Key informational links: • Glossary • List of Recommended Books • Introduction to Options (The Options Playbook) • The complete side-bar informational links, for mobile app users.

Links to the most frequent answers

I just made (or lost) $____. Should I close the trade? Yes, close the trade, because you had no plan for an exit to limit your risk. Your trade is a prediction: a plan directs action upon an (in)validated prediction. Take the gain (or loss). End the risk of losing the gain (or increasing the loss). Plan the exit before the start of each trade, for both a gain, and maximum loss. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture)
Why did my options lose value, when the stock price went in a favorable direction? • Options extrinsic and intrinsic value, an introduction (Redtexture)
Getting started in options • Calls and puts, long and short, an introduction (Redtexture) • Exercise & Assignment - A Guide (ScottishTrader) • Some useful educational links • Some introductory trading guidance, with educational links • Options Expiration & Assignment (Option Alpha) • Expiration time and date (Investopedia)
Common mistakes and useful advice for new options traders • Five mistakes to avoid when trading options (Options Playbook) • Top 10 Mistakes Beginner Option Traders Make (Ally Bank) • One year into options trading: lessons learned (whitethunder9) • Here's some cold hard words from a professional trader (magik_moose) • Thoughts after trading for 7 Years (invcht2) • Avoiding Stupidity is Easier than Seeking Brilliance (Farnum Street Blog) • 20 Habits of Highly Successful Traders (Viper Report) (40 minutes) • There's a bull market somewhere (Jason Leavitt) (3 minutes)
Trade planning, risk reduction and trade size, etc. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture) • Trade Checklists and Guides (Option Alpha) • An illustration of planning on trades failing. (John Carter) (at 90 seconds) • Trade Simulator Tool (Radioactive Trading) • Risk of Ruin (Better System Trader)
Minimizing Bid-Ask Spreads (high-volume options are best) • Fishing for a price: price discovery with (wide) bid-ask spreads (Redtexture) • List of option activity by underlying (Market Chameleon) • List of option activity by underlying (Barchart) • Open Interest by ticker (optinistics)
Closing out a trade • Most options positions are closed before expiration (Options Playbook) • When to Exit Guide (Option Alpha) • Risk to reward ratios change over the life of a position: a reason for early exit (Redtexture)
Options Greeks and Option Chains • An Introduction to Options Greeks (Options Playbook) • Options Greeks (Epsilon Options) • Theta Decay: The Ultimate Guide (Chris Butler - Project Option) • Theta decay rates differ: At the money vs. away from the money • Theta: A Detailed Look at the Decay of Option Time Value (James Toll) • Gamma Risk Explained - (Gavin McMaster - Options Trading IQ) • How Often Within Expected Move? Data Science and Implied Volatility (Michael Rechenthin, PhD - TastyTrade 2017) • A selected list of option chain & option data websites
Selected Trade Positions & Management • The Wheel Strategy (ScottishTrader) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Options Playbook) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Redtexture) • Synthetic option positions: Why and how they are used (Fidelity) • Covered Calls Tutorial (Option Investor) • Take the loss (here's why) (Clay Trader) (15 minutes) • The diagonal calendar spread and "poor man's covered call" (Redtexture) • Creative Ways to Avoid The Pattern Day Trader Rule (Sean McLaughlin) • Short calls and puts, and dividend risk (Redtexture) • Options and Dividend Risk (Sage Anderson, TastyTrade) • Options contract adjustments: what you should know (Fidelity) • Options contract adjustment announcements / memoranda (Options Clearing Corporation)
Implied Volatility, IV Rank, and IV Percentile (of days) • An introduction to Implied Volatility (Khan Academy) • An introduction to Black Scholes formula (Khan Academy) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile: Which is better? (Project Option) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile in Trading (Tasty Trade) (video)
Miscellaneous: Economic Calendars, International Brokers, RobinHood, Pattern Day Trader, CBOE Exchange Rules, Contract Specifications, TDA Margin Handbook, EU Regulations on US ETFs, US Taxes and Options • Selected calendars of economic reports and events • An incomplete list of international brokers dealing in US options markets (Redtexture) • Free brokerages can be very costly: Why option traders should not use RobinHood • Pattern Day Trader status and $25,000 margin account balances (FINRA) • How to find out when a new expiration is opening up: email: [email protected] for the status of a particular ticker's new expirations.
• CBOE Contract Specications and Trading Days & Hours • TDAmeritrade Margin Handbook (18 pages PDF) • Monthly expirations of Index options are settled on next day prices • PRIIPS, KIPs, EU regulations, ETFs, Options, Brokers • Key Information Documents (KIDs) for European Citizens (Options Clearing Corporation) • Taxes and Investing (Options Industry Council) (PDF) • CBOE Exchange Rules (770+ pages, PDF) • NASDAQ Options Exchange Rules
Following week's Noob thread: Oct 14-20 2019
Previous weeks' Noob threads:
Sept 30 - Oct 6 2019 Sept 23-29 2019 Sept 16-22 2019 Sept 09-15 2019 Sept 02-09 2019 Aug 26 - Sept 02 2019
Complete NOOB archive, 2018, and 2019
submitted by redtexture to options [link] [comments]

Shariah ETFs?

Just want to know if anyone is investing in Shariah compliant ETFs, according to the Lowyat post on directly investing in the S&P 500 there is no Shariah-listed ETFs available (I've checked). So according to my research there seems to be a few ways:
  1. Wahed Invest, though it's indirect investment since they spread out the investment even if risk-tolerance is maxed out.
  2. MyETF US Dow Jones US50 Index. Listed in the local stock market but subject to Forex changes, denominated in USD, prices not following NAV (a lot of the times if you buy you'll buy at a PREMIUM compared to NAV) and unknown whose exchange rate we're using. Even then I don't know whether my broker will charge additional fees in order to convert. The fund itself charges around 0.4% annually calculated from your number of stocks times the NAV price at the time of fee charges. Also probably 30% dividend witholding tax.
Anyone willing to share their knowledge? Maybe the sifus could put out a Shariah-compliant version for us noobs. :P
submitted by alliedwithmysoul to MalaysianPF [link] [comments]

Noob Safe Haven Thread | Sept 23-29 2019

Post any options questions you wanted to ask, but were afraid to ask. A weekly thread in which questions will be received with equanimity. There are no stupid questions, only dumb answers.   Fire away. This is a weekly rotation with past threads linked below. This project succeeds thanks to people thoughtfully sharing their knowledge and experiences (YOU are invited to respond to questions posted here.)
Perhaps you're looking for an item in the frequent answers list below.
For a useful response about a particular option trade, disclose position details, so that responders can assist. Vague inquires receive vague responses. Tell us: TICKER -- Put or Call -- strike price (for each leg, on spreads) -- expiration date -- cost of option entry -- date of option entry -- underlying stock price at entry -- current option (spread) market value -- current underlying stock price -- your rationale for entering the position.   .
Key informational links: • Glossary • List of Recommended Books • Introduction to Options (The Options Playbook) • The complete side-bar informational links, for mobile app users.

Links to the most frequent answers

I just made (or lost) $____. Should I close the trade? Yes, close the trade, because you had no plan for an exit to limit your risk. Your trade is a prediction: a plan directs action upon an (in)validated prediction. Take the gain (or loss). End the risk of losing the gain (or increasing the loss). Plan the exit before the start of each trade, for both a gain, and maximum loss. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture)
Why did my options lose value, when the stock price went in a favorable direction? • Options extrinsic and intrinsic value, an introduction (Redtexture)
Getting started in options • Calls and puts, long and short, an introduction (Redtexture) • Exercise & Assignment - A Guide (ScottishTrader) • Some useful educational links • Some introductory trading guidance, with educational links • Options Expiration & Assignment (Option Alpha) • Expiration time and date (Investopedia)
Common mistakes and useful advice for new options traders • Five mistakes to avoid when trading options (Options Playbook) • Top 10 Mistakes Beginner Option Traders Make (Ally Bank) • One year into options trading: lessons learned (whitethunder9) • Here's some cold hard words from a professional trader (magik_moose) • Thoughts after trading for 7 Years (invcht2) • Avoiding Stupidity is Easier than Seeking Brilliance (Farnum Street Blog) • 20 Habits of Highly Successful Traders (Viper Report) (40 minutes) • There's a bull market somewhere (Jason Leavitt) (3 minutes)
Trade planning, risk reduction and trade size, etc. • Exit-first trade planning, and using a risk-reduction trade checklist (Redtexture) • Trade Checklists and Guides (Option Alpha) • An illustration of planning on trades failing. (John Carter) (at 90 seconds) • Trade Simulator Tool (Radioactive Trading) • Risk of Ruin (Better System Trader)
Minimizing Bid-Ask Spreads (high-volume options are best) • Fishing for a price: price discovery with (wide) bid-ask spreads (Redtexture) • List of option activity by underlying (Market Chameleon) • List of option activity by underlying (Barchart) • Open Interest by ticker (optinistics)
Closing out a trade • Most options positions are closed before expiration (Options Playbook) • When to Exit Guide (Option Alpha) • Risk to reward ratios change over the life of a position: a reason for early exit (Redtexture)
Options Greeks and Option Chains • An Introduction to Options Greeks (Options Playbook) • Options Greeks (Epsilon Options) • Theta Decay: The Ultimate Guide (Chris Butler - Project Option) • Theta decay rates differ: At the money vs. away from the money • Theta: A Detailed Look at the Decay of Option Time Value (James Toll) • Gamma Risk Explained - (Gavin McMaster - Options Trading IQ) • How Often Within Expected Move? Data Science and Implied Volatility (Michael Rechenthin, PhD - TastyTrade 2017) • A selected list of option chain & option data websites
Selected Trade Positions & Management • The Wheel Strategy (ScottishTrader) • Rolling Short (Credit) Spreads (Options Playbook) • Synthetic option positions: Why and how they are used (Fidelity) • Covered Calls Tutorial (Option Investor) • Take the loss (here's why) (Clay Trader) (15 minutes) • The diagonal calendar spread and "poor man's covered call" (Redtexture) • Creative Ways to Avoid The Pattern Day Trader Rule (Sean McLaughlin) • Options and Dividend Risk (Sage Anderson, TastyTrade) • Options contract adjustments: what you should know (Fidelity) • Options contract adjustment announcements / memoranda (Options Clearing Corporation)
Implied Volatility, IV Rank, and IV Percentile (of days) • An introduction to Implied Volatility (Khan Academy) • An introduction to Black Scholes formula (Khan Academy) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile: Which is better? (Project Option) • IV Rank vs. IV Percentile in Trading (Tasty Trade) (video)
Miscellaneous: Economic Calendars, International Brokers, RobinHood, Pattern Day Trader, CBOE Exchange Rules, Contract Specifications, TDA Margin Handbook, EU Regulations on US ETFs, US Taxes and Options • Selected calendars of economic reports and events • An incomplete list of international brokers dealing in US options markets (Redtexture) • Free brokerages can be very costly: Why option traders should not use RobinHood • Pattern Day Trader status and $25,000 margin account balances (FINRA) • How to find out when a new expiration is opening up: email: [email protected] for the status of a particular ticker's new expirations.
• CBOE Contract Specications and Trading Days & Hours • TDAmeritrade Margin Handbook (18 pages PDF) • Monthly expirations of Index options are settled on next day prices • PRIIPS, KIPs, EU regulations, ETFs, Options, Brokers • Key Information Documents (KIDs) for European Citizens (Options Clearing Corporation) • Taxes and Investing (Options Industry Council) (PDF) • CBOE Exchange Rules (770+ pages, PDF) • NASDAQ Options Exchange Rules
Following week's Noob thread: Sept 30 - Oct 6 2019
Previous weeks' Noob threads: Sept 16-22 2019 Sept 09-15 2019 Sept 02-09 2019 Aug 26 - Sept 02 2019
Complete NOOB archive, 2018, and 2019
submitted by redtexture to options [link] [comments]

How to Trade ETF Index Funds for Beginners WHAT ETFS ARE SUITABLE FOR SCALPING? PART 17 ‍♂️ Best ETFs For Passive Investing (For BEGINNERS) - YouTube Be careful of ETFs - MoneyWeek Videos - YouTube ETF Erklärung: Was sind ETFs? In nur 4 Minuten erklärt ... Investing Basics: ETFs - YouTube Trading Stocks vs Forex (Which One Wins?) - YouTube Trading Options on Futures VS ETFs - YouTube ETF vs FOREX. - 1000's Of Dollars Each Day Trading Exchange Traded Funds The Difference Between Forex & Currency ETFs

Forex Kalender Market Heat Map Market Sentiment Indikation DAX30 Analyse EUR/USD Analyse Dow Jones Analyse ... Wenn Sie beispielsweise einen ETF auf den DAX Index abgeschlossen haben und der Index um 15% steigt, steigt auch Ihr ETF um diesen Wert. Ein ETF CFD versetzt Sie außerdem in die Lage, den Basiswert zu hedgen, sich also gegen eine von Ihnen ungewünschte Entwicklung abzusichern, indem ... An ETF is an exchange traded fund that generally holds assets. For example, a forex ETF is likely to hold over the counter currency pairs, currency futures as well as sovereign bonds that are denominated in a specific currency. Initially, liquidity was an issue, but during the past 5-years, ETF’s have experienced increasing volume as more ... Currency ETF: Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) invested in a single currency or basket of currencies. Currency ETFs aim to replicate movements in currency in the foreign exchange market by holding ... Denn grundsätzlich gibt es ETFs, die synthetisch und somit mit Swap-Geschäften oder Derivaten auf Grundlage eines Index einen ETF errichten. Allerdings – und das wurde an dieser Stelle wohl ... Ein ETF (Exchange Traded Fund) ist ein Investmentfonds, der an der Börse gehandelt wird. Eine spezielle ETF Börse gibt es aber nicht. ETFs heißen auch "Indexfonds", weil sie einen Index wie den ... ETFS FANG+ ETF ETF: Aktueller FANG ETF Kurs, Charts, technische Analysen, historische Daten, Volumen, Marktkapialisierung, Fondsvermögen & News. Wie unterscheiden sich ETFs von Indexzertifikaten? Wie unterscheiden sich ETFs von Indexzertifikaten? Im Gegensatz zu einem Fonds ist ein Zertifikat ein spezielle Form der Schuldverschreibung. Ein Zertifikat wird von einer Bank herausgegeben und bildet die Wertentwicklung von anderen Finanzprodukten nach. ETF Strategie - LYXOR WORLD WATER (DR) ETF ETF - Aktuelle Kursdaten, Nachrichten, Charts und Performance For example, if it is predicted that Indian stock markets could outperform the emerging markets index, then it’s possible to go long on Indian NIFTY50 and short on the MSCI emerging markets index. Trading Using CFDs: ETF indexes provide an excellent asset base for CFD trading, where an agreement is made with a counterparty to exchange the difference in NAV between the start date and the ... An ETF, or exchange traded fund, is a marketable security that tracks an index, a commodity, bonds, or a basket of assets like an index fund. Unlike mutual funds, an ETF trades like a common stock on a stock exchange. ETFs experience price changes throughout the day as they are bought and sold. ETFs typically have higher daily liquidity and lower fees than mutual fund shares, making them an ...

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How to Trade ETF Index Funds for Beginners

2. VXX or similar - super volatile ETF now VXXB 3. GDX (Gold Miners), NUGT 4. Sector Specific (XLE, XLF, IBB) 5. EEM - emerging 6. EWZ Related Videos What is Scalping in Forex & How do You Do It? 🤔 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/SubscribeTDAmeritrade Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) have grown in popularity among investors over the past decades. This video can he... The Difference Between Forex & Currency ETFs WealthPress. Loading... Unsubscribe from WealthPress? ... Jack Bogle on Index Funds, Vanguard, and Investing Advice - Duration: 51:14. The Motley Fool ... 🎁 Get my Price Action Course for FREE! Click here to find out how: https://2ndskiesforex.com/xtb/ Learn the major differences between trading stocks vs tradi... Exchange traded funds (ETFs) can be a great way to invest in the stock market or commodities. They're cheap, simple and easily traded. However, a fair number... ETF einfach erklärt! Kostenloses Depot inkl. 20€ Prämie: https://www.finanzfluss.de/go/depot?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=4&utm_campaign=comdirect-depot&... ETFs are sort of a new trading vehicle. ETFs are electronically traded funds that represent underlying securities or commodities or indexes. There are thousands of different ETFs available today ... Look at detailed examples of options on futures trades versus ETF option trades to understand the benefits of trading. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/sub... How to trade ETF Index Funds for Beginners. If you are just beginning to trade the stock market, it is important to start out trading with index funds or ETF. Subscribe to our channel https ... 📈📚 FREE Training Crash Course + Join Our Investing Academy https://bit.ly/theinvestingacademy Today I'll share with you 3 ETFs that would be great for pass...

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